Desyncra EEG Scans
Reduced tinnitus brain wave activity

CHANGED NEURAL BEHAVIOR

Desyncra™ for Tinnitus applies CR® Neuromodulation to disrupt or “desynchronize” the pathological, neuronal behavior.

Improved symptoms are reflected in EEG imaging, showing reduced delta wave activity across tinnitus neural networks.

NEURONAL HYPERACTIVITY

Recent developments in neuroscience have led to a clearer understanding of the neuronal activity behind tinnitus.

Neurons in the auditory cortex become hyperactive and synchronized, which is perceived by patients as tinnitus.

CR® Neuromodulation disrupts and desynchronizes hyperactivity in the brain
CR® Neuromodulation disrupts and desynchronizes hyperactivity in the brain

TARGETING THE TINNITUS

Research has revealed how the hyperactivity behind tinnitus can be observed in the auditory cortex. The auditory cortex is physically organized according to the pitch of sounds that it perceives, from low to high pitch.

The Desyncra™ proprietary pitch-matching procedure makes use of this to target the therapy to the hyperactive region in the auditory cortex.

Proprietary pitch-matching targets hyperactivity 
in the auditory cortex
Proprietary pitch-matching targets hyperactivity in the auditory cortex
TI16-0106_Letter_E16-00.indd

REDUCED TINNITUS SYMPTOMS

Patients report improved symptoms, including recent loudness, and annoyance and changed pitch of tinnitus tones.

Learn more about the therapy and benefits.

THERAPY & BENEFITS

BEYOND TINNITUS

CR® Neuromodulation therapy offers solutions beyond tinnitus to other neurological pathologies, including Parkinson’s isease, epilepsy and migraine.

The mode of delivery is quite different for each of these neurological conditions. Yet in each case, the CR® Neuromodulation is designed to disrupt the synchronized activity and reduce the patient’s symptoms.

Clinical research involving hundreds of patients have been published to date
Clinical research involving hundreds of patients have been published to date

RESEARCH WORLDWIDE

Desyncra™ research is global, including at Stanford University, Veterans Affairs Portland, and centers in England and Germany.

Clinical Studies

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. Click for more information.

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close